August 21st   Leave a comment

A hot day! I did a tour of the path from Troustie to Wormiston to Balcomie and back through Kilminning and Saucehope this morning and it felt like Africa. That feeling of the first part of the day being the best before it gets too hot to see or do anything. It does make a change for Crail. There was not much more to find from yesterday. I don’t think anything new came in last night and I couldn’t refind the whinchat and lesser whitethroat of yesterday. I did find a pied flycatcher (no. 140 for the Crail year list) in the garden of the yellow house at Wormiston Farm, making up for missing the one at Balcomie yesterday. But like everything yesterday it was hard to find, barely calling and only visible briefly in the dense foliage. A fall in late October is much easier to get to grips with when the leaves have gone from the trees. The juvenile curlew sandpiper had moved along from Balcomie Beach to one of the tidal pools further north. It was still tame and I walked past it at less than 20 meters before I noticed it. Close up you can really see how nicely marked and neat they are. It was alone, leaving the dunlins still on the beach with the sanderlings.

The juvenile curlew sandpiper that has been at Balcomie Beach for the last two days

The juvenile curlew sandpiper that has been at Balcomie Beach for the last two days

A pair of emerald damselflies about to lay eggs in my pond and add to the biodiversity in my garden

A pair of emerald damselflies about to lay eggs in my pond and add to the biodiversity in my garden

I spent some of the afternoon watching the pond that we put in my back garden last autumn. It has been establishing through the summer but we hit a significant milestone today with our first damselfly visiting. An emerald damselfly – very small and slight – but with lovely bronze green highlights. No sooner had we seen our first male than another two turned up and starting mating! Within 20 minutes the pair had climbed down a reed until they were completely underwater and the female started laying eggs on the stem. The first male flew around a bit and then left in disgust; after a further 20 minutes the pair had finished and left too. Hopefully leaving us with damselflies now resident in our pond. The tadpoles next spring will have to look out for themselves a bit more.

Posted August 21, 2016 by wildcrail in Sightings

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s